woman after rhinoplasty side view

Rhinoplasty Photos: Before and After

Commonly referred to as a “nose job,” rhinoplasty is a plastic surgery procedure for correcting and reconstructing the nose, either to restore function or enhance appearance. In the surgery, an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist), a maxillofacial surgeon (jaw, face, and neck specialist), or a plastic surgeon, creates a functional, aesthetic, and facially proportionate nose by altering and manipulating the cartilage.

Patient #1

This patient had three prior sinus and septal surgeries elsewhere that resulted in a collapsed saddle nose. She was also bothered by her bifid (double) tip and hanging columella (inferior edge of midline septum) showing too much nasal mucosa. Cartilage was taken from her ear to create grafts on top of her nose to correct the saddle deformity. The fullness of the cartilage of her nasal tip was also trimmed and narrowed to get rid of the double and creased tip and the columella was raised to decrease nostril show. Normally cartilage from her nasal septum would have been used to recreate the dorsum of the nose, but there was none left due to the prior surgeries, so ear cartilage was used. Her sinus surgery was also revised, as there was some scarring partially blocking her sinuses again. Her sinuses are now doing great, and she is delighted with the appearance of her nose.

Before
After
Before
After

Patient #2

This patient had her nose broken by her child’s head 14 years previously.  This resulted in a crooked nose off to the left with an irregular hump, and a dramatically crooked septum to the right blocking her airway. The nose was also overprojected (too far out from the face), hung down too low, the tip was bulbous, and she had irregular bone on both sides of the nose from the fracture. During her procedure the hump was removed, the bones were broken and straightened and the tip was set back to decrease the projection of the nose. The tip was then narrowed, the columella raised and the septum straightened. A piece of cartilage was then placed between the right sidewall of the nose and the dorsum of the nose giving better symmetry and increasing airflow, cartilage grafts were placed over the left bony depressions, and the tip support was strengthened.  She is now breathing great and is very pleased with the appearance of here nose.

woman before rhinoplasty
Before
woman after rhinoplasty front view
After
woman before rhinoplasty side view
Before
woman after rhinoplasty side view
After

Patient #3

This patient broke her nose as a teenager and had a surgery elsewhere in an attempt to correct it, but her breathing got worse and a saddle deformity appeared on the top of the nose. A second surgery was performed soon after by the same surgeon but it did not improve her breathing or her appearance. More recently her young child threw his head back and broke her nose again. During her procedure her septum was straightened to improve airflow. An irregular piece of bone was discovered, which had been used in an attempt to correct the bump and dip on her dorsum. This bone graft was removed, and a graft from her septal cartilage was made and placed in the dip of the nose. Nasal bone irregularities were then removed, the bones were broken and straightened, and the base of the nose was raised. She now breathes great and has a natural and undamaged appearing nose.

Before
After
Before
After

Patient #4

This patient had rhinophyma, an overgrowth of sebaceous glands often seen in long standing acne rosacea.  The excess weight of tissue in rhinophyma causes collapse of the nostrils and decreased airway.  He also had a crooked septum which made it hard to breathe through his nose.  During his procedure the excess tissue from the tip, top and sidewalls of his nose was removed and these areas were allowed to naturally heal back over. The septum was then straightened.  He can now breathe great and has a much more normal appearing nose.

Before
After
Before
After

Patient #5

This patient is a kick boxer who has had his nose broken many times. During his procedure the hump on his nose was removed, the nose was broken and the bones straightened. The uneven nostrils were then straightened, along with the septum. He now breathes great, the nose looks natural, and he will try very hard not to break it again!

Before
After
Before
After

Rhinoplasty in Utah

There are many reasons our patients choose rhinoplasty (or nose jobs if we use the casual term).

The Ear, Nose and Throat Center is committed to helping you look and feel your best. Our patients rely on our staff of ENT doctors because they know they will receive exceptional care and attention—whether we repair a deviated septum, reset a broken nose or conduct a comprehensive rhinoplasty.

Contact us at 801-328-2522 to learn more about rhinoplasty in Utah.

Read: What is Rhinoplasty and Reconstructive Nasal Surgery

Read: 3 Reasons to Choose Rhinoplasty

man with broken nose

Broken Nose: Before and After Photos

A man appeared in our office with a dramatically broken nose. Dr. John Bennett, one of our ENT doctors in our Salt Lake City office, determined we needed to break the patient’s nose again in order to reset and improve the look.

Dr. Bennett performed a rhinoplasty and the results are dramatic. Where the patient’s nose was once crooked, it now sits straight and natural. The patient was pleased and recovery time was rapid. The before and after photos are separated by two months only.

man with broken nose
BEFORE – Broken nose curves toward right
man after broken nose
AFTER – Nose appears straight
man with twisted nose
BEFORE – curvature of nose visible in nostrils
broken nose after rhinoplasty
AFTER – Nose is straight and aligned

Rhinoplasty Procedures in Salt Lake City and Draper, Utah

Broken noses and nasal fractures are common. We’re expert at setting and treating broken noses. Surprisingly, setting a broken nose is less painful than you might expect. It’s best to set the broken nose within two weeks of injury. This helps ensure the nose does not set in an unnatural position. However, if it has been longer than two weeks after the injury, we can break the nose and reset it as we did in this example.  Typically, a broken nose and/or rhinoplasty requires a week of healing.

Read: Repairing a Broken Nose

If you’re suffering from a broken nose, please call 801-328-2522 and set an appointment in our Salt Lake City or Draper, Utah offices. We’ll assess options and develop a treatment plan that repairs your broken nose and improves your appearance.

Read: What is Rhinoplasty and Reconstructive Nasal Surgery

Read: 10 Tips for Quick Recovery from Nose Surgery

Man recovering from nose surgery

10 Tips for Nose Surgery Recovery

A nose job or rhinoplasty can help you breathe easier or make you feel better about how you look and feel. In fact, there are many reasons for nose jobs.

But once you’ve had nose surgery, you want to recover quickly and without complications.

“The nose will be tender to touch for six weeks following surgery. So you need to take it easy, slow down and follow these tips for the first few weeks following nose surgery,” says Dr. John Bennett, a Utah ear, nose and throat doctor who specializes in rhinoplasty. “A little caution following surgery will pay off in a faster rhinoplasty recovery.”

Read: What to Expect During Nose Surgery

“People are surprised how often they bump their nose after surgery, especially from large dogs, small children, and partners,” Dr. Bennett continues. “If your partner is a restless sleeper, they may need to sleep elsewhere for a while to avoid their arm smacking the recently operated nose when the partner rolls over.”

Dr. Bennett recommends nose job patients follow these 10 tips for fast rhinoplasty recovery:

10 Tips for Fast Nose Job Recovery

  1. DON’T exercise vigorously for at least two weeks. Take it easy and avoid strenuous exercise that forces your body to consistently and aggressively move up, down and around. Ease back into exercise during your third week of recovery. Avoid playing basketball and volleyball for six weeks, or any other activity where you might get smacked in the nose by a ball or an elbow.
  2. DON’T go swimming. Your nose will be tender and swimming—especially diving—will move your nose around while it’s still recovering. Plus, chlorine may get inside your nose, which can sting. Stay away from the swimming pool for at least three to four weeks following your nose surgery.
  3. DON’T blow your nose for two weeks. Enough said here.
  4. DON’T eat foods that require heavy chewing. Save that steak dinner for later and eat simple, mild foods you can enjoy with minimal effort.
  5. DON’T laugh too hard or smile too wide. We know this sounds like stern advice. Just remember that your recovery is temporary and the less your nose bounces around or stretches, the better.
  6. DON’T brush your teeth aggressively. This may sound a bit silly, but aggressive brushing can cause you to move your upper-lip more than you might expect, and your upper-lip is connected to your sensitive nose. The less you move everything around your nose, the better you’ll feel and the faster you’ll heal.
  7. DON’T pull clothing over your head. Temporarily avoid t-shirts, sweatshirts and sweaters while your heal. Favoring button-down shirts while your nose heals will help you avoid unintended pain or nose movement.
  8. DON’T rest glasses on your nose up to four weeks following surgery. The less weight you place on your nose in the short term, the better the results in the long term. If you have contact lenses, now is a good time to use them. If you can live without sunglasses for the short term, we recommend you do so. If you absolutely must wear eyeglasses, it is best to tape the hard nasal splint onto the nose, then set the glasses on the splint. Otherwise, you may risk permanently pushing in the nasal bones. You may also want to hold glasses in your hands and peer through them without placing them on your nose.
  9. DON’T expose unprotected skin to the sun for three months following surgery. Using sunscreen whenever you venture out into the sun is always good advice. Following a nose job, however, limiting damaging sun exposure is critically important since too much sun can cause permanent discoloration on your nose.
  10. DON’T smoke for three weeks. This advice applies three weeks before and after surgery. If you are a smoker, this is a good time to stop!

Dr. Bennett concludes, “Every Salt Lake City rhinoplasty patient receives specific post-operative instructions that include directions that help care for a repaired nose following surgery, as well as explain what to expect during the recovery process.”

Read: Recovery from Rhinoplasty Surgery

Learn About Utah Nose Jobs

Contact the Ear, Nose and Throat Center at 801-328-2522 to meet with an ENT doctor who regularly performs rhinoplasty surgery in Utah. We understand noses and work with our patients in Salt Lake City, Park City, Draper and Sandy, Utah to help determine if a nose job makes sense.

3 Reasons to Get a Nose Job

Think about your nose for a moment.

For good or bad, it’s one of the first things people notice about your appearance since it sits right in the center of your face. Now follow that thought with this comforting fact: no one’s nose is perfect–even those Hollywood actresses with seemingly flawless features and nostrils have small imperfections.

Noses get noticed. That’s why countless nose jobs (or rhinoplasty if we use the technical name) are performed each year. In Utah, we see the number of Utah nose jobs growing. Part of the reason is the healthy lifestyle Utah people live. All those mountain bike rides, rock climbing, baseball, football and rugby games take their toll on noses. When accidents happen, Utah rhinoplasty procedures usually follow.

Read: The Facts about Rhinoplasty and Reconstructive Nasal Surgery

But accidents aren’t the only reason for a nose job. There are good reasons for a nose job that are both medical and cosmetic. No matter the reason, our Utah ear, nose and throat doctors perform hundreds of nose jobs in Salt Lake City, Draper and Park City each year. Let’s look at 3 reasons to get a nose job.

Reason #1:  Your Nose Is Repaired for Medical Reasons

You’ve likely heard of a deviated septum. A deviated septum is the medical name for a condition where the center cartilage of the nose (the nasal septum) is off-center. A deviated septum creates difficulty breathing through the nose. Typically, the condition is more pronounced on one side of the nose and can sometimes result in sinusitis or sinus infections.

It’s estimated that more than 80-percent of all nasal septums are off-center. When a doctor diagnoses a deviated septum, he or she will perform a septoplasty, which is the surgical correction of a deviated septum. Septoplasties are typically not peformed on patients younger than 18 because the septum grows until age 18.

The Ear, Nose and Throat Center of Salt Lake City realizes great surgical outcomes following septoplasty.

“I truly enjoy seeing how happy people are after a septoplasty when they can breathe through both sides of the nose, often for the first time ever,” says Dr. John Bennett of the Ear, Nose and Throat Center. “Many people don’t realize how much trouble they are having breathing through the nose.”

Many people are born with a deviated septum. Others have experienced some sort of accident or trauma and the result is that the internal cartilage in their nose has shifted and prevents them from breathing easily.

The Ear, Nose and Throat doctors will diagnose your condition and perform a septoplasty that ultimately improves breathing. Even better for family members and sleeping partners, repairing s deviated septum typically results in less snoring. So those sleepless nights for the snorers and those who live in close proximity may quickly come to and end.

“Sleeping and exercise are dramatically improved after septoplasty,” adds Dr. Bennett.

Read: The Facts about Snoring

Reason #2:  Your Nose is Damaged in an Accident

Utah residents love to exercise. They love to get outside and push themselves to their limits. Some of us feel nearly invincible after climbing to the top of a mountain or pulling down a game-winning rebound. But gravity and blunt force trauma have a great way of bringing us back to earth and we often treat broken noses on patients who face-planted while skiing, climbing or mountain biking or took a nasty elbow to the face during a game.

Car accidents are another likely culprit in creating broken noses. The good news is that if a broken nose is treated within two weeks of the accident, the results are very positive.

Read: Repairing a Broken Nose

“After a nose is broken and displaced, we have about a two-week window in which we can return the nasal bones into their correct position with little trouble,” says Dr. Bennett. “After two weeks, the bones become fixed in the fractured position and it is much more difficult to straighten.”

Some patients consider their adjusted nose an improvement on the old one. Our advice following nose surgery is to take it easy, but some Utahns never learn. Guess that’s the curse of living in a state where going nose-to-nose with your competition and the elements is a passion.

Reason #3:  You Choose a Nose Job for Cosmetic Reasons

Your nose is one of your most prominent features. For good or bad. Some patients may have nose bumps they would like smoothed. Others may feel their nose is too big or too small. Still others may have had a rhinoplasty in the past and are unhappy with the results. Whatever your reason for seeking a nose job, the Ear, Nose and Throat Center wants to help you feel good about your nose and your appearance.

“The ideal nose should complement the face, and not detract from it,” says Dr. Bennett. “When we look at a person, we look at the eyes, the mouth, the hair. If a nose calls attention to itself, that can be a distraction. The nose can ‘make or break’ a face.”

A good nose job can help raise your self esteem. A bad nose can knock it down. We specialize in great nose jobs. Yet while a great nose job can help you feel more confident about your appearance, it can’t change deeper self-esteem issues. And we want to be sure you have realistic expectations about how a nose job will impact your life. So we will spend time with you discussing rhinoplasty options long before we ever operate.

Read: How to Prepare for Nose Surgery

“The best rhinoplasty simply removes the faults of the nose and, in the end, the nose does not look ‘operated’,” says Dr. Bennett. “I want my patients to look in the mirror after surgery and still see themselves, but with the nasal flaws removed.”

Contact the Ear, Nose and Throat Center at 801-328-2522 to learn more about nose jobs in Salt Lake City, Draper and Park City, Utah.